Hey Y'all. I'm 24 and live in LA. Workin at a kick ass animation studio here! I'm a huge Comedy, Comic book, and all around silly shit fan. I'm just an alien through and through. Tryin' to make believe im you. Tryin' to fit.

Check out my personal art work at my other tumblr http://onesoullost.tumblr.com/

Enjoy!
Background Illustrations provided by: http://edison.rutgers.edu/
Reblogged from aronjshay  182 notes
aronjshay:

Ohmygosh. Soooooo I wanted to draw something ridiculous and cute for my boyfriend, so I drew him this. His favorite character from The Lego Movie is Benny. I like drawing stupid-cute stuff, and kitties—- so I drew him a BennyKitty :3 BENNYKITTEH LIKES SPACESHIPS! :D
Don’t judge me lol :)

aronjshay:

Ohmygosh. Soooooo I wanted to draw something ridiculous and cute for my boyfriend, so I drew him this. His favorite character from The Lego Movie is Benny. I like drawing stupid-cute stuff, and kitties—- so I drew him a BennyKitty :3 BENNYKITTEH LIKES SPACESHIPS! :D

Don’t judge me lol :)

Reblogged from salomonfenix  7,623 notes
angelophile:


You could argue comic books have little importance in the grander scheme of things. But comic books make a big statement in a small way. We won’t have blockbuster movies about a Muslim superhero until we can all be excited about a comic book portraying one. When Marvel created Khan, it took a shot at breaking the typical paradigm of superheroes. While it’s a small gesture when measured up to the entire comic book world, it’s another step in the movement for equality in entertainment.
For the larger part of the decade, there was a potent cloud of racism and hatred towards Muslim people. Today, the fact we can portray young Muslim girls as superheroes is a beacon of hope for what is to come. Sure, a lot of people will say “it’s just a comic book.” But I’d like to think somewhere out there, it’s making a difference in a young Muslim girl’s life. And even if the message gets lost and Khan’s character doesn’t sell well, at least a young girl could have her own superhero to look up to.

Global Thinking: Kamala Khan Marvel launches female Muslim Superhero by Kavahn Mansouri.

angelophile:

You could argue comic books have little importance in the grander scheme of things. But comic books make a big statement in a small way. We won’t have blockbuster movies about a Muslim superhero until we can all be excited about a comic book portraying one. When Marvel created Khan, it took a shot at breaking the typical paradigm of superheroes. While it’s a small gesture when measured up to the entire comic book world, it’s another step in the movement for equality in entertainment.

For the larger part of the decade, there was a potent cloud of racism and hatred towards Muslim people. Today, the fact we can portray young Muslim girls as superheroes is a beacon of hope for what is to come. Sure, a lot of people will say “it’s just a comic book.” But I’d like to think somewhere out there, it’s making a difference in a young Muslim girl’s life. And even if the message gets lost and Khan’s character doesn’t sell well, at least a young girl could have her own superhero to look up to.

Global Thinking: Kamala Khan Marvel launches female Muslim Superhero by Kavahn Mansouri.